Should you enroll in Medicare, or should you stay on your employer group health plan?

The answer to this question depends on the structure of your employer group health plan and the Medicare options available in your area.  I have helped many clients realize significant savings on their health insurance by providing the optimal Medicare solution for their situation .

The key factors that you should consider are: 1) your health plan premium, 2) your deductible, 3)  your co-insurance or co-pay responsibility, and 4) your plan’s maximum out of pocket.

I can help you assess these factors and compare them to the Medicare options available in your area.  Finding the optimal Medicare solution for your situation will provide you with medical and pharmaceutical coverage, control over your wallet, and peace of mind.

Call  me at 303-725-7009, or email me at connie.ward@maaxzie.com, to schedule an appointment to evaluate your employer group plan and your Medicare options.

Turning 65?

Medicare enrollment begins three months before your 65th birthday and continues for 7 months. If you are currently receiving Social Security benefits, you don’t need to do anything. You will be automatically enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B effective the month you turn 65. If you do not receive Social Security benefits, then you will need to sign up for Medicare by calling the Social Security Administration at 800-772-1213 or online at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/medicareonly/. It is best to do it as early as possible so your coverage begins as soon as you turn 65.

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If you are still working and have an employer or union group health insurance plan, it is possible you do not need to sign up for Medicare Part B right away. You will need to find out from your employer whether the employer’s plan is the primary insurer. If Medicare, rather than the employer’s plan, is the primary insurer, then you will still need to sign up for Part B. Even if you aren’t going to sign up for Part B, you should still enroll in Medicare Part A, which may help pay some of the costs not covered by your group health plan. For more information on Medicare and work, click here.  For more on Medicare Part A, click here. Many people choose to enroll in Medicare to save money over their employer group plan.  If you would like to learn if you could save money by enrolling in Medicare, call Connie at 303-725-7009.

Contribute to the State of Colorado’s Strategic Action Plan on Aging

Help our state plan for aging

The Strategic Action Planning Group on Aging is tackling the pressing issues facing our state and families as Colorado’s population ages. The group, which we are proud to partner with, is working to ensure all Coloradans have the support they need to enjoy a healthy, mobile, and vibrant lifestyle as they age. SAPGA needs your help and perspectives as it works to answer questions about affordable housing, supports for family caregivers, community design, transportation options, workforce needs, retirement security, the viability of federal programs, Contribute to the State of Colorado’s Strategic Action Plan on Agingimpact on the state budget and access to quality health care.  

Your input is essential to Colorado’s future and SAPGA’s recommendations to our leaders. Visit colorado.gov/agingstrategy to weigh in, or share your thoughts on social media with#plan4aging.

Turning 65?

For most people, turning 65 means you’re eligible for Original Medicare, Part A and Part B. Even if you have medical insurance through an Employer Group Health Plan (EGHP), learn about the benefits of Medicare. You might save significant money depending on what your EGHP premiums and deductibles are. Keep in mind, that if you rely on your EGHP for any dependents, your enrollment in Medicare will effect their insurance.

If you are retiring at 65, and applying for Social Security Retirement benefits, you may automatically be enrolled in Medicare.

Automatically enrolling in Original Medicare

If you’re under 65, you can apply for Medicare Part A and Part B through Social Security or the Railroad Retirement Board at the same time that you apply for retirement benefits.

If this is the case, you’ll be automatically enrolled in Medicare when you turn 65, and you don’t need to submit another application. You should receive your Medicare card in the mail three months before your 65th birthday, and your benefits will start on the first day of the month you turn 65. If your birthday is on the first of the month, then your benefits start on the first day of the previous month.

If you aren’t getting retirement benefits yet, you will need to sign up manually for Medicare Part A and/or Part B through Social Security or the Railroad Retirement Board:

Visit the Social Security website. You can apply for Medicare only if you’re not yet ready to receive retirement benefits.

You can also call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, from 7AM to 7PM. TTY users can call 1-800-325-0778. Tuesday afternoons are usually the best time to call.

Apply in person at your local Social Security office.

If you worked for a railroad, you can apply for Medicare through the Railroad Retirement Board at 1-877-772-5772, Monday through Friday, from 9 AM to 3:30 PM. TTY users can dial 1-312-751-4701.

If you feel overwhelmed with the details and rules associated with Medicare, you are not alone. If you live in Colorado, and would like assistance, peruse my website, and call 303-725-7009 for an appointment.